Do not daydream about the problems in your life, the evil in the world, the troubles around the next bend. That is what real life is for. Instead, daydream about things that make you smile. No summer workday is complete without a grown person staring at the wall, just laughing.
New York Times

When you daydream, you allow your mind to relax. You allow your unconscious thoughts to surface. You give your neocortex a break and let the inner most memories surface. It’s healthy and freeing. On any given day, I might have two hours of coaching, following by a business development meeting, helping a client with her business plan or human resources problems and then a dinner meeting. Eight hours or more of nothing but focused thoughtful outward planning objective behavior. Boy, does my mind need a break. Sure, I can try to fit in yoga, and often do. But, during the day when I need a rest, I sit in my office at my desk and stare – maybe out the window, maybe into space. I let my mind wander and release me from the tiredness or fatigue I might be experience. One day recently, staring out the window, I saw a mother holding her child’s hand apparently teaching him to cross the street carefully. That brought back a lovely memory of a day in a park in Germany with my own mom. My mind went tumbling around – I can’t even tell you every step of the journey – until it was time to pull myself back into the minute. I had a smile on my face, a desire to speak to my mom and a warm feeling inside. I was ready, willing and able to get back to work with a truly refreshed outlook.

Another positive result happened too. An unconscious connection was made between my daydreaming and a sticky problem that one of my client’s was experiencing at work. She had become frustrated to the point of distraction as she was struggling with an employee who seemed impervious to her instructions. In turn, I was feeling bad because despite the various approaches available to her, my client hadn’t found a comfortable way to deal with this employee. I had an “aha” moment. Maybe more nurturing and less “strictly business” was what this employee needed from her. And, knowing my client approaches people and problems from her heart, I was certain this would work for her as well. Together, my client and I would work on a new approach. My daydreaming had created a solution for her, for me and, I hope, for her employee. So, what should you do the next time you feel like work is getting to you? The next time you need to get out into the sun? The next time you want a day off or to play a round of golf? The next time you feel that your beach vacation cannot come soon enough. DAY DREAM. Seriously, let your mind wander. Let it take you to happy fulfilling places of wishes and dreams.

Enjoy your summer. Take this little gift of mine and run with it. Have fun! Give yourself a break and if someone sees you laughing to yourself, teach them to do the same.